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Delmonte
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Injuries

Postby Delmonte Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:01 pm

Hey Laxers, with the season round the corner, I know I'm probably not the only one carrying an injury or in the recovering process, and if your not then you likely to pick up a knock or two during the season.

I felt it would benefit everyone if we had a little discussion about different workouts or stretching etc.. to recover from certain injuries.

I myself have a shoulder injury that doesn't seem to want to heal, I think i've hurt the rotator cuff like i did a few years ago with my other shoulder.
If you ave been through a similar injury to this, do you have any useful tips to recover as quick as possible.

Feel free to add any injury tips or issues that are common in lacrosse though.
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woldham
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Re: Injuries

Postby woldham Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:26 pm

My shoulders have been able to sublux (half dislocate) when asked for as long as I remember and it took me until the beginning of this summer to decide to get them sorted after some pretty painful episodes. 3 months of physio later and they feel much stronger for it but will always have a lower stability than normal even after 3 months of twice daily physio sessions and carrying it on through the season - moral of the story is get anything and everything seen to asap if it won't go away with basic RICE treatment. get it checked out by someone and put the effort into rehab or it will bite you in the ass when you have a pole checking your shot at the top of your crank...
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Mort rotu
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Re: Injuries

Postby Mort rotu Mon Sep 05, 2011 10:07 pm

I badly dropped my AC ligament in my shoulder 2 years ago (connects collar bone and rotator cuff, commonly known as a separated shoulder) and if I don't do some form of exercise using it every day (push ups work quite nicely) it starts to seize up after a week or so.

The Physio recommended push ups as part of the rehab treatment, so any advice that they give you is worth carrying out.

As Woldham says, get it seen to by somebody who knows what they are doing and take their advice.
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Tree13
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Re: Injuries

Postby Tree13 Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:23 am

At my age I find that niggling injuries take much longer to heal, so I place myself firmly in the "prevention is better than cure" camp. To this end I would say that just stretching before and after games is not enough. I have dabbled in yoga and pilates, having noticed that several top-level NFL players who have continued playing well into their 30's recommend both. I'm convinced that they have made a difference and I'm sticking with them.

In a similar vein, fit healthy bodies heal quicker from injury than poorly-maintained ones do. Look after your health, fitness and flexibility in advance and you will find that when you suffer the injuries that are inevitable in a high intensity collision sport such as lacrosse, rugby or american football, you will recover a little quicker.
Tree13's posts only reflect Tree13's personal opinions. They do not represent the views of any other person, team or club. Any interpretation to the contrary is invalid.

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Moaning Git
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Re: Injuries

Postby Moaning Git Tue Sep 06, 2011 8:37 pm

Personally I find that maintaining a special diet ensures that your body is well padded, giving additional protection to those vital organs. Yes it slows you down, but other players find it takes longer to go around you, or they tend to bounce off if they bulldodge you. Plus the bruising spreads over the fatty tissue in a spectacular manner creating a delightful rainbow effect which creates a talking point at the local baths.
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dannyecko
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Re: Injuries

Postby dannyecko Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:48 pm

Moaning Git wrote:Personally I find that maintaining a special diet ensures that your body is well padded, giving additional protection to those vital organs. Yes it slows you down, but other players find it takes longer to go around you, or they tend to bounce off if they bulldodge you. Plus the bruising spreads over the fatty tissue in a spectacular manner creating a delightful rainbow effect which creates a talking point at the local baths.


:lol:
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Likkedeeler #27
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Re: Injuries

Postby Likkedeeler #27 Mon Sep 12, 2011 12:54 pm

The German Lax (DLAXV) are currently publishing a call for responses to a dissertation on Lax injuries. This study appears to try and get a complete picture of European Lax injuries.

The ELF is currently looking to provide support in publishing this at European and all member nations' level. Once the web content on it is available, it will be posted on laxforums, too.

Yours in Lacrosse,

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webby
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Re: Injuries

Postby webby Mon Sep 12, 2011 2:09 pm

Likkedeeler #27 wrote:The German Lax (DLAXV) are currently publishing a call for responses to a dissertation on Lax injuries. This study appears to try and get a complete picture of European Lax injuries.

The ELF is currently looking to provide support in publishing this at European and all member nations' level. Once the web content on it is available, it will be posted on laxforums, too.

Yours in Lacrosse,

Henning


Interesting. I assume from your post that this is in the early stages, e.g. collecting the data? A study was carried out at the Men's World Championships last summer with the aim to look into injuries that occur at the "elite" level. The data has been analysed and the write up has been submitted to be presented later this year. Once it's published I will post up some more info.

Injuries wise - prevention is better than cure. Keep fit, eat healthily, drink plenty of water etc. Alcohol and diuretics should be avoided 24 hours before games. Try and make sure whatever workout/training you do addresses all areas of the body, and not just chest and arms like a large proportion of gym rats do. You should be pushing and pulling, working your front/back and each side equally. Do the little things - focus on problematic areas like your rotator cuffs, core etc.

There is a bad habit of not warming up before lacrosse games/trainings. If you do not warm up enough, your body will not be ready to play at full speed.

Stretch. There is contradicting evidence as to whether you should stretch before exercise, as there is a theory that prolonged stretching can reduce muscle contractability. However, dynamic stretching is the new craze, which puts your soft tissues through the available range of motion, while also encouraging active movements to help increase blood flow and wake up the nervous system. Passive stretching is great to do afterwards, or throughout the day. Many people like to stretch first thing in the morning and then again in the evening as a way to relax. Muscles and soft tissues need to be held in a lengthened position for an extended period of time before they actually change structurally. A quick 5-10second stretch will not lengthen your muscles beyond their current state. The GB Olympic medical team has their athletes do each stretch for 30seconds, 5 times, 5 times per day. Check out http://www.mobilitywod.com/ for some cool stretches that really address areas that many people have no idea they have reduced range of movement. He even uses lacrosse balls (single, or two taped together) for self myofascial release. Go to the "last page" (it's a blog, so the earliest posts are actually on the later pages, if that makes sense).

If you have an injury, rest it! Let your body heal. When it occurs, follow the PRICE rule. That being said, get in there early. You may remember what happened when you injured yourself, or you may have a niggling injury that never goes away but you don't remember doing anything specific to cause it. Either way, don't just leave it. Go see your GP, sports medic or physio (you should be able to refer yourself now to NHS physios). Remember in relation to injuries, physios can pretty much do everything an osteopath, chiropractor, massage therapist and orthotist/podiatrist can do, and will chose the right techniques to suit your specific circumstances. Not that I'm biased or anything.

Deep soft tissue massage is one of the most effective means for resolving soft tissue injuries. Scar tissue is good, it is what the body uses to heal itself. But your body makes an excess of scar tissue and inflammation which can lead to adhesions. Those adhesions need to be broken up, and that scar tissue needs to be realigned to make sure it acts as closely to muscle/tendon/ligament it can. When you injure yourself, muscle tone increases. Massage decreases muscle tone. Get a foam roll and work out any sore spots, and/or go get some physio/massage therapy.

If you want more info in regards to injuries, rehab, prehab, or where to get help/advice, PM me.
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GlyndwrLax1404
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Re: Injuries

Postby GlyndwrLax1404 Fri Sep 16, 2011 12:39 am

Just be warned that NHS physios have waiting lists and if an injury isn't "life limiting" (in my case a repeating dislocating shoulder) they aren't obliged to even see you. Priority is given to the most severe cases, and quite rightly so.

But definitely get it sorted! The Crossfit Gym in Glasgow loves lacrosse balls for their stretching sessions and those guys know about fitness.

I'd put my money that most lacrosse injuries occur in innocuous situations. Although I do recall playing in a game where a guy lost his spleen as the result of a particularly brutal hit!
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webby
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Re: Injuries

Postby webby Fri Sep 16, 2011 7:42 pm

GlyndwrLax1404 wrote:Just be warned that NHS physios have waiting lists and if an injury isn't "life limiting" (in my case a repeating dislocating shoulder) they aren't obliged to even see you. Priority is given to the most severe cases, and quite rightly so.


In the Newcastle trust it's about 6weeks wait from GP referral to Physio assessment. And they can't ignore your referral. Yes the more serious cases get prioritised, but that means they get seen within 2 weeks instead of 6. **** I know, but that's just the way the NHS is at the moment.

There are plenty of private physios around who will see you much sooner, but will cost you £30-40 per session. Many remain open after normal working hours so you can go in the evenings after work etc. If you want any contacts, PM me :)

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